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Thread: Extra Parts List

  1. #21
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    Chaff indeed.

  2. #22
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    I am still waiting on the wheels. Evidently, the blanks available will match the backside spacing and inside brake spacing. The next thing is to machine them, and send them along.

    This takes time, and I am only two weeks into the project so far, while doing a fair amount of travel. When the wheels become available, I will give out all the information so that you can buy them.

    I have been told that the first set will be shipped within the month. They will have to be test fitted. The wheels will be forged aluminum.

    Besides this manufacturer, I am down to only 12 other guys that make wheels.

    If you are looking for a bargain, well, this is not it. They will probably cost about the same as Dymags, but would be more attractive to some. The guys are not local, and I had to start from scratch. If you are in a hurry, buy Dymags, or have some wheels built up.

    This is not the only project that I am waiting on. Really, there is much more exciting stuff going on.

    As for the heat problem, I don't believe that there will be one. I may make a shield for the front turbo, and a cooling stack (maybe not). The rear turbo will be taken care of by the shield over the mufflers/cats. The engine compartment will have adequate air circulation, around the engine and out the back. Heat will be directed out the back, through the clamshell vents (at low speeds) and maybe through the engine compartment floor.

    I wont be using turbo blankets. I am not paranoid about heat in the Noble. My approach to heat control is entirely different than that of other Noble owners and installers. I wont be painting or padding with thick ceramic blankets, or blinging out the engine compartment with yards of gold leaf. No lizzard spray or aligator paint. You might be surprised what a little stainless and a reflective coating can do when mixed with moving air.

  3. #23
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    Paul,

    None of this is rocket science. The idea is to keep the heat from melting the importat stuff, and to make sure that the heat can be carried away with air circulation.

    Heat shields don't have to be thick, or even large. They do need to have a reflective insulation and air space between the item that is hot, and the shield. There should be some air flow under the shield. This will cut by 100s of degrees the amount of heat radiated from the part, and the shield.

    You can put a cover over a turbo, and that will reduce the heat radiated from the housing and shield. Put some air flow around that turbo, and it gets cooler. Put a stack in the shield and vent the heat and circulating air, and it gets cooler still. Vent it into the right place, and you get negative pressure under the shield, drawing in air under the shield, which is energized by the rising of the heated air under the shield and stack. You wont get the shield to where you could touch it, but you will keep stuff about 3" away cool enough to touch, especially if there is further air circulation over the shield. Air is a good insulator.

    The larger alternator is for some additional fans to carry off some heat, and to circulate air through the engine compartment. The fans will be doing two jobs.
    I will go into the rest of this after the system has been tested. This may be sometime next week.

    There is a fundamental difference in the way that the engine compartment on my will be cooled.

    What doesn't really work well is putting blankets everywhere. It is useful in many cases, but when dealing with this sort of tight engine compartment, it is better to take a manufacturer's view.

    The idea is to make the components last longer, and the car to run more efficiently.

    When the car is running, there can be plenty of airflow through the engine compartment, from the side scoops out the back, or beneath the car, into the low pressure area of the difuser. The problem comes when the car is at a standstill, when turned off hot, or when idling in traffic.

    Then, airflow must be restored mechanically. Fans. However, I want the fans to to a couple of things for me, and not just beat the air to keep it flowing around the engine.

    Anyway, the air goes in, across the hot bits, then out the back, carrying away heat. Think of it in that way, and you will see lots of obvious things that you can do to improve cooling when the car is moving. Then carry it one step further to assist the air when the car is still. Your car has the scoops opened up, so you are half way there.

    I don't care about tunnel heat. It is radiated by the water pipes. I guess that I could put a thin blanket over the pipes, or run some air through the box. Naaah. I think the trick is a plastic shift knob.

    The reality is that the Nobles are not burning up due to the heat. Mostly, melting component problems are caused by incorrect installations. What really gets Noble owners hot is the loss of power due to radiated heat. Well, that problem can be eliminated completely.

    No blankets, paint and probably no gold. Still, cool. All the power, all the time.

  4. #24
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    None of this is rocket science. The idea is to keep the heat from melting the importat stuff, and to make sure that the heat can be carried away with air circulation.

    Heat shields don't have to be thick, or even large. They do need to have a reflective insulation and air space between the item that is hot, and the shield. There should be some air flow under the shield. This will cut by 100s of degrees the amount of heat radiated from the part, and the shield.

    You can put a cover over a turbo, and that will reduce the heat radiated from the housing and shield. Put some air flow around that turbo, and it gets cooler. Put a stack in the shield and vent the heat and circulating air, and it gets cooler still. Vent it into the right place, and you get negative pressure under the shield, drawing in air under the shield, which is energized by the rising of the heated air under the shield and stack. You wont get the shield to where you could touch it, but you will keep stuff about 3" away cool enough to touch, especially if there is further air circulation over the shield. Air is a good insulator.

    The larger alternator is for some additional fans to carry off some heat, and to circulate air through the engine compartment. The fans will be doing two jobs.
    I will go into the rest of this after the system has been tested. This may be sometime next week.

    There is a fundamental difference in the way that the engine compartment on my will be cooled.

    What doesn't really work well is putting blankets everywhere. It is useful in many cases, but when dealing with this sort of tight engine compartment, it is better to take a manufacturer's view.

    The idea is to make the components last longer, and the car to run more efficiently.

    When the car is running, there can be plenty of airflow through the engine compartment, from the side scoops out the back, or beneath the car, into the low pressure area of the difuser. The problem comes when the car is at a standstill, when turned off hot, or when idling in traffic.

    Then, airflow must be restored mechanically. Fans. However, I want the fans to to a couple of things for me, and not just beat the air to keep it flowing around the engine.

    Anyway, the air goes in, across the hot bits, then out the back, carrying away heat. Think of it in that way, and you will see lots of obvious things that you can do to improve cooling when the car is moving. Then carry it one step further to assist the air when the car is still. If your car has the scoops opened up, so you are half way there.

    I don't care about tunnel heat. It is radiated by the water pipes. I guess that I could put a thin blanket over the pipes, or run some air through the box. Naaah. I think the trick is a plastic shift knob.

    The reality is that the Nobles are not burning up due to the heat. Mostly, melting component problems are caused by incorrect installations. What really gets Noble owners hot is the loss of power due to radiated heat. Well, that problem can be eliminated completely.

    No blankets, paint and probably no gold. Still, cool. All the power, all the time.

  5. #25
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    Quote Originally Posted by S.J.Morgan
    Paul,
    Your car has the scoops opened up, so you are half way there.
    Dear SJ,

    I'm not sure if you mean me, Paul C, but yes my side scoops are opened up and I cannot emphasise enough how much they improve the engine bay cooling. Even without any attempt at getting any air out at the back the extra forced air makes the whole engine bay noticeably cooler. Before the scoops the engine bay chassis members would be too hot to touch and the power steering and coolant tanks would regularly go on bubbling away for 15 minutes or so (even after running the engine to cool the turbos) after a run, now they are never more than mildly warm and the coolant never bubbles. If you want a quick and easy solution just do what I've done. No need for extra fans or anything else.

    My engine, on the mechanical water temp gauge, runs about 10'c cooler than it did before the side scoop mods.

    Regards
    PauL C

  6. #26
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    The scoops are opened up on the M400s. Most of the cooling problems, or should I say engine heating problems, are solved with good airflow.

    Now, the trick is to use that air to cool the charge air before it carries off the engine heat.

  7. #27
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    Quote Originally Posted by S.J.Morgan
    None of this is rocket science. The idea is to keep the heat from melting the importat stuff, and to make sure that the heat can be carried away with air circulation.

    Heat shields don't have to be thick, or even large. They do need to have a reflective insulation and air space between the item that is hot, and the shield. There should be some air flow under the shield. This will cut by 100s of degrees the amount of heat radiated from the part, and the shield.

    You can put a cover over a turbo, and that will reduce the heat radiated from the housing and shield. Put some air flow around that turbo, and it gets cooler. Put a stack in the shield and vent the heat and circulating air, and it gets cooler still. Vent it into the right place, and you get negative pressure under the shield, drawing in air under the shield, which is energized by the rising of the heated air under the shield and stack. You wont get the shield to where you could touch it, but you will keep stuff about 3" away cool enough to touch, especially if there is further air circulation over the shield. Air is a good insulator.

    The larger alternator is for some additional fans to carry off some heat, and to circulate air through the engine compartment. The fans will be doing two jobs.
    I will go into the rest of this after the system has been tested. This may be sometime next week.

    There is a fundamental difference in the way that the engine compartment on my will be cooled.

    What doesn't really work well is putting blankets everywhere. It is useful in many cases, but when dealing with this sort of tight engine compartment, it is better to take a manufacturer's view.

    The idea is to make the components last longer, and the car to run more efficiently.

    When the car is running, there can be plenty of airflow through the engine compartment, from the side scoops out the back, or beneath the car, into the low pressure area of the difuser. The problem comes when the car is at a standstill, when turned off hot, or when idling in traffic.

    Then, airflow must be restored mechanically. Fans. However, I want the fans to to a couple of things for me, and not just beat the air to keep it flowing around the engine.

    Anyway, the air goes in, across the hot bits, then out the back, carrying away heat. Think of it in that way, and you will see lots of obvious things that you can do to improve cooling when the car is moving. Then carry it one step further to assist the air when the car is still. If your car has the scoops opened up, so you are half way there.

    I don't care about tunnel heat. It is radiated by the water pipes. I guess that I could put a thin blanket over the pipes, or run some air through the box. Naaah. I think the trick is a plastic shift knob.

    The reality is that the Nobles are not burning up due to the heat. Mostly, melting component problems are caused by incorrect installations. What really gets Noble owners hot is the loss of power due to radiated heat. Well, that problem can be eliminated completely.

    No blankets, paint and probably no gold. Still, cool. All the power, all the time.


    None of this is rocket science. The idea is to keep the heat from melting the importat stuff, and to make sure that the heat can be carried away with air circulation.

    Heat shields don't have to be thick, or even large. They do need to have a reflective insulation and air space between the item that is hot, and the shield. There should be some air flow under the shield. This will cut by 100s of degrees the amount of heat radiated from the part, and the shield.

    You can put a cover over a turbo, and that will reduce the heat radiated from the housing and shield. Put some air flow around that turbo, and it gets cooler. Put a stack in the shield and vent the heat and circulating air, and it gets cooler still. Vent it into the right place, and you get negative pressure under the shield, drawing in air under the shield, which is energized by the rising of the heated air under the shield and stack. You wont get the shield to where you could touch it, but you will keep stuff about 3" away cool enough to touch, especially if there is further air circulation over the shield. Air is a good insulator.

    The larger alternator is for some additional fans to carry off some heat, and to circulate air through the engine compartment. The fans will be doing two jobs.
    I will go into the rest of this after the system has been tested. This may be sometime next week.

    There is a fundamental difference in the way that the engine compartment on my will be cooled.

    What doesn't really work well is putting blankets everywhere. It is useful in many cases, but when dealing with this sort of tight engine compartment, it is better to take a manufacturer's view.

    The idea is to make the components last longer, and the car to run more efficiently.

    When the car is running, there can be plenty of airflow through the engine compartment, from the side scoops out the back, or beneath the car, into the low pressure area of the difuser. The problem comes when the car is at a standstill, when turned off hot, or when idling in traffic.

    Then, airflow must be restored mechanically. Fans. However, I want the fans to to a couple of things for me, and not just beat the air to keep it flowing around the engine.

    Anyway, the air goes in, across the hot bits, then out the back, carrying away heat. Think of it in that way, and you will see lots of obvious things that you can do to improve cooling when the car is moving. Then carry it one step further to assist the air when the car is still. If your car has the scoops opened up, so you are half way there.

    I don't care about tunnel heat. It is radiated by the water pipes. I guess that I could put a thin blanket over the pipes, or run some air through the box. Naaah. I think the trick is a plastic shift knob.

    The reality is that the Nobles are not burning up due to the heat. Mostly, melting component problems are caused by incorrect installations. What really gets Noble owners hot is the loss of power due to radiated heat. Well, that problem can be eliminated completely.

    No blankets, paint and probably no gold. Still, cool. All the power, all the time.

    None of this is rocket science. The idea is to keep the heat from melting the importat stuff, and to make sure that the heat can be carried away with air circulation.

    Heat shields don't have to be thick, or even large. They do need to have a reflective insulation and air space between the item that is hot, and the shield. There should be some air flow under the shield. This will cut by 100s of degrees the amount of heat radiated from the part, and the shield.

    You can put a cover over a turbo, and that will reduce the heat radiated from the housing and shield. Put some air flow around that turbo, and it gets cooler. Put a stack in the shield and vent the heat and circulating air, and it gets cooler still. Vent it into the right place, and you get negative pressure under the shield, drawing in air under the shield, which is energized by the rising of the heated air under the shield and stack. You wont get the shield to where you could touch it, but you will keep stuff about 3" away cool enough to touch, especially if there is further air circulation over the shield. Air is a good insulator.

    The larger alternator is for some additional fans to carry off some heat, and to circulate air through the engine compartment. The fans will be doing two jobs.
    I will go into the rest of this after the system has been tested. This may be sometime next week.

    There is a fundamental difference in the way that the engine compartment on my will be cooled.

    What doesn't really work well is putting blankets everywhere. It is useful in many cases, but when dealing with this sort of tight engine compartment, it is better to take a manufacturer's view.

    The idea is to make the components last longer, and the car to run more efficiently.

    When the car is running, there can be plenty of airflow through the engine compartment, from the side scoops out the back, or beneath the car, into the low pressure area of the difuser. The problem comes when the car is at a standstill, when turned off hot, or when idling in traffic.

    Then, airflow must be restored mechanically. Fans. However, I want the fans to to a couple of things for me, and not just beat the air to keep it flowing around the engine.

    Anyway, the air goes in, across the hot bits, then out the back, carrying away heat. Think of it in that way, and you will see lots of obvious things that you can do to improve cooling when the car is moving. Then carry it one step further to assist the air when the car is still. If your car has the scoops opened up, so you are half way there.

    I don't care about tunnel heat. It is radiated by the water pipes. I guess that I could put a thin blanket over the pipes, or run some air through the box. Naaah. I think the trick is a plastic shift knob.

    The reality is that the Nobles are not burning up due to the heat. Mostly, melting component problems are caused by incorrect installations. What really gets Noble owners hot is the loss of power due to radiated heat. Well, that problem can be eliminated completely.

    No blankets, paint and probably no gold. Still, cool. All the power, all the time.

    None of this is rocket science. The idea is to keep the heat from melting the importat stuff, and to make sure that the heat can be carried away with air circulation.

    Heat shields don't have to be thick, or even large. They do need to have a reflective insulation and air space between the item that is hot, and the shield. There should be some air flow under the shield. This will cut by 100s of degrees the amount of heat radiated from the part, and the shield.

    You can put a cover over a turbo, and that will reduce the heat radiated from the housing and shield. Put some air flow around that turbo, and it gets cooler. Put a stack in the shield and vent the heat and circulating air, and it gets cooler still. Vent it into the right place, and you get negative pressure under the shield, drawing in air under the shield, which is energized by the rising of the heated air under the shield and stack. You wont get the shield to where you could touch it, but you will keep stuff about 3" away cool enough to touch, especially if there is further air circulation over the shield. Air is a good insulator.

    The larger alternator is for some additional fans to carry off some heat, and to circulate air through the engine compartment. The fans will be doing two jobs.
    I will go into the rest of this after the system has been tested. This may be sometime next week.

    There is a fundamental difference in the way that the engine compartment on my will be cooled.

    What doesn't really work well is putting blankets everywhere. It is useful in many cases, but when dealing with this sort of tight engine compartment, it is better to take a manufacturer's view.

    The idea is to make the components last longer, and the car to run more efficiently.

    When the car is running, there can be plenty of airflow through the engine compartment, from the side scoops out the back, or beneath the car, into the low pressure area of the difuser. The problem comes when the car is at a standstill, when turned off hot, or when idling in traffic.

    Then, airflow must be restored mechanically. Fans. However, I want the fans to to a couple of things for me, and not just beat the air to keep it flowing around the engine.

    Anyway, the air goes in, across the hot bits, then out the back, carrying away heat. Think of it in that way, and you will see lots of obvious things that you can do to improve cooling when the car is moving. Then carry it one step further to assist the air when the car is still. If your car has the scoops opened up, so you are half way there.

    I don't care about tunnel heat. It is radiated by the water pipes. I guess that I could put a thin blanket over the pipes, or run some air through the box. Naaah. I think the trick is a plastic shift knob.

    The reality is that the Nobles are not burning up due to the heat. Mostly, melting component problems are caused by incorrect installations. What really gets Noble owners hot is the loss of power due to radiated heat. Well, that problem can be eliminated completely.

    No blankets, paint and probably no gold. Still, cool. All the power, all the time.

  8. #28
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    Default Scoops?

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Cundy
    Dear SJ,

    I'm not sure if you mean me, Paul C, but yes my side scoops are opened up and I cannot emphasise enough how much they improve the engine bay cooling. Even without any attempt at getting any air out at the back the extra forced air makes the whole engine bay noticeably cooler. Before the scoops the engine bay chassis members would be too hot to touch and the power steering and coolant tanks would regularly go on bubbling away for 15 minutes or so (even after running the engine to cool the turbos) after a run, now they are never more than mildly warm and the coolant never bubbles. If you want a quick and easy solution just do what I've done. No need for extra fans or anything else.

    My engine, on the mechanical water temp gauge, runs about 10'c cooler than it did before the side scoop mods.

    Regards
    PauL C

  9. #29
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    Default Scoops?

    Quote Originally Posted by Paul Cundy
    Dear SJ,

    I'm not sure if you mean me, Paul C, but yes my side scoops are opened up and I cannot emphasise enough how much they improve the engine bay cooling. Even without any attempt at getting any air out at the back the extra forced air makes the whole engine bay noticeably cooler. Before the scoops the engine bay chassis members would be too hot to touch and the power steering and coolant tanks would regularly go on bubbling away for 15 minutes or so (even after running the engine to cool the turbos) after a run, now they are never more than mildly warm and the coolant never bubbles. If you want a quick and easy solution just do what I've done. No need for extra fans or anything else.

    My engine, on the mechanical water temp gauge, runs about 10'c cooler than it did before the side scoop mods.

    Regards
    PauL C

    What are you referring to in "opening up the scoops". I have an m12 (no extra exterior scoop over the rear fender scoop). It has a mesh-like grill between exterior and interior. Do you mean, rip out this mesh? Is there any particular advantage or disadvantage to this mesh?

    I am thinking of getting aftermarket external scoop extenders, like on the m400's.
    Ron K

  10. #30
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    Quote Originally Posted by DrDaKine
    What are you referring to in "opening up the scoops". I have an m12 (no extra exterior scoop over the rear fender scoop). It has a mesh-like grill between exterior and interior. Do you mean, rip out this mesh? Is there any particular advantage or disadvantage to this mesh?

    I am thinking of getting aftermarket external scoop extenders, like on the m400's.
    Ron K
    Here is a link to photos of what Paul has done (from his webpage):http://paulcundy.smugmug.com/gallery/359222/4
    Ferrari 308GTSi.
    Lotus Elise, SY, SCCA T2 legal.
    Noble M400, 515bhp.

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