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Thread: Rossion Heater Control Valve Replacement

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  1. #1
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    Default Rossion Heater Control Valve Replacement

    The Heater Control Valve (HCV) is located in the center tunnel, just ahead of the shifter(same location as in the Noble). It can be accessed from under the car by removing screws and taking off the center panel.

    You'll first notice the coolant lines running between the motor and radiator, since they're at the bottom of the tunnel. If you push them out of the way, you can get to the HCV and related hardware, which is attached to the top of the tunnel.

    The heater control valve in the Noble is controlled by a cable that runs from the dial in the HVAC control panel into the center tunnel, to the HCV. When Rossion upgraded to electronic HVAC controls, they retained the same HCV used in the Noble, but sourced an electronic servo to open and close the HCV. The Rossion team designed a metal bracket that positions the electronic servo so that it operates the HCV (see photo). The bracket, in turn is held in an upside down U-clamp at the top of the tunnel with four screws. There is a five wire harness that runs from the HVAC temperature control knob inside the car to the servo motor in the center tunnel. One wire carries 12V, one wire is ground, the other three wires carry the control signal telling the servo motor to open or close the HCV, and by how much.

    ** Before you get much further in the process, and as you're removing the 5/8 inch heater hoses from the HCV, you'll need to mark them with tape or something. It's pretty easy to figure out the top hose coming from the back of the car is the hot water going to the heater core, and the bottom hose going to the back of the car is the return line to the motor. On the heater core side, the top hose sends hot water to the heater core, the bottom is the return that sends it back to the motor.

    The metal bracket positions the electronic servo and HCV together, so that the servo can open and close the HCV. The electronic servo is held in place to the bracket by screws, while the HCV is riveted to the metal bracket.
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  2. #2
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    PART 2

    ** You might be tempted to drill out the rivets holding the HCV in the bracket assembly and leave everything else in place. Don't do that, learn from my mistake. I tried drilling the rivets while attached in the tunnel and discovered that the heat from the drilling transferred through the metal parts and melted the plastic actuator part of the electronic servo that operates the HCV. The heat caused the plastic actuator to melt and catch fire where it landed on the back of my hand.

    You'll need to remove the four screws attaching the bracket assembly to the upside down U-clamp. You can't see the screws, you can only feel them. There are two screws on each side, the clearance between the upside down U-clamp and side of the drive tunnel is maybe an inch on each side. So you'll need a mini ratchet screwdriver to get in there. I have a wadsworth mini ratchet set that I was able to get the screws out with. If you don't have one, google mini ratchet driver, you can find that or other makes that you should be able to get in there with.

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  3. #3
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    PART 3

    Once you get the bracket assembly out, you can see how the electronic servo operates the HCV. Unscrew the electronic servo from the assembly, then you can drill the rivets and remove the old HCV.

    Next, you have a couple of different options. 1) buy a new HCV and reinstall everything in the same place, or 2) move the bracket assembly back to the engine compartment area to get it out of the center tunnel, or 3) find a 4 port HCV that has an integral servo motor, and install that in the engine compartment area instead of the original factory setup.

    I elected to go with the third option, drawback being that I would have to figure out which wires from the new HCV to connect to the Rossion wire harness back to the HVAC knob in the interior.

    You may decide this is a good time to replace the 5/8 inch heater hose running between the motor and heater core, like I did. I bought 10 feet of 5/8 inch red silicone heater hose, and 10 feet of blue 3/8 inch silicone heater hose so I could color code the lines going to the heater core (red) and coming back from the heater core (blue). In order to route the new lines through the tunnel (things are very tight in there), I bought a 5/8" X 5/8" coupler. I connected the new heater hose to the old, and as I pulled out the old heater hose from the engine compartment, the new heater hose was fed in. **Make sure the hose clamps are extra tight, so the coupler doesn't slip out**
    I made the following connections for the heater hoses. Hot water supply came off a fitting on the motor, the return line to the motor went into the manifold by the gas tank with all the fittings on it. The hot water supply went into the front line going into the heater core, the return line from the heater core is the one in back.
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  4. #4
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    PART 4

    I found a 4 port HCV on ebay that seemed like it would work. It's made by Air Manufacturing Corp, part number 5701555LINCOLN. I picked that one because it had a five wire harness, and it's own temperature control knob, in case I couldn't get it to work with the Rossion harness. Which I was able to do, with the help of a friend more familiar with electronics.
    The Rossion harness has brown, white, green, yellow, and blue colored wires.
    The Air Manufacturing Corp HCV that I picked out has green, blue, white, red, and black colored wires.
    We were able to get the HCV to work with the Rossion temp control knob, by connecting the wires (Rossion to HCV harness) in this way.
    Brown to Green (12V source)
    White to Blue (ground)
    Green to White
    Yellow to Red
    Blue to Black
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  5. #5
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    Awesome write up!!!

    Thank you so much for doing this. Hopefully I wont have to do the same, but know I know what's involved if I need to do it

  6. #6
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    Good write up. I end up just deleting it as I never needed heat in the cabin lol. If it gets stuck of and doesnít close all the way more hot air is blended into the cabin

  7. #7
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    I had to replace mine, because it started leaking. The HCV isn’t the most durable metal, I suspect most Rossions and Nobles will require attention at some point. If you wanted to avoid the hassle of replacing, you could just re-route the supply line back to the motor and do away with a heater all together, like you, most owners typically don’t drive these in bad weather anyway.

  8. #8

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    I wonder if the factory Rossi one is made by Thermotion.


    The wiring is fairly simple:
    1. 12v wire (powers the actuator)
    2. Ground
    3. Potentiometer + (power to the potentiometer)
    4. Potentiometer - (ground)
    5. Potentiometer signal (signal to determine where the pot is at)

    Rossis made relocating that HCV much much easier than the Nobles. Curious what control panel Rossis use.

  9. #9
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    No, I tried thermotion, couldn’t get it to work - that was just me, but since it’s a five wire setup somebody else might get it to work. I’ll even send the thermotion HCV i didn’t use if somebody wants to try.

  10. #10

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    Quote Originally Posted by Gen2rt View Post
    No, I tried thermotion, couldn’t get it to work - that was just me, but since it’s a five wire setup somebody else might get it to work. I’ll even send the thermotion HCV i didn’t use if somebody wants to try.
    What was the issue with the Thermotion? Was it not controlling the valve whatsoever or just not controlling it correctly?

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