Page 1 of 2 12 LastLast
Results 1 to 10 of 11

Thread: Noble at the Track

  1. #1
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    1,766
    Rep Power
    20

    Default Noble at the Track

    Is there a Noble Bible or Top 10 as far as tracking it? Kinda of a definitely do and not do list. I'm going this weekend and am not sure what to stock up on and what to check other than the oil and air pressure.
    Will two track days normally eat up the breaks?
    Are folks ordering extra wheels with Corsas just in case?

  2. #2

    Default

    I'll start you off.

    Check your alignment before going. This will make a pretty big difference in the way the car feels and handles.

    Check your tire pressures. If you filled them with nitrogen or dry air, the pressures will probably not change quite as much on the track as if you filled them with air with a bit of moisture in them.

    Check your seatbelts.

    Be sure to bring your HANS device.
    RacePrecision GotApex

    "Be ashamed to die until you have won some victory for humanity." ~ Horace Mann

  3. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by DerekFSU
    Is there a Noble Bible or Top 10 as far as tracking it? Kinda of a definitely do and not do list. I'm going this weekend and am not sure what to stock up on and what to check other than the oil and air pressure.
    Will two track days normally eat up the breaks?
    Are folks ordering extra wheels with Corsas just in case?
    My Tips (fwiw):

    On the day put a bung in the bleed hole of the power steering resevoir and strap it with heat resistant tape or a tie wrap to stop it leaking under high g.

    Make sure your fluid levels and tyre pressures are ok beforehand.

    Take a foot pump and pressure guage for doing tweeks as recommended.

    For the M400 I set the pressures to 20psi front, 30 rear, do some laps to get them warm and then quickly adjust them down to 20 and 30 psi again. Nitrogen fill is good idea if it's convenient - you'll apparantly get less pressure variation.

    Also checking the tightness of the wheel nuts with a torque wrench during the day is a good idea - around 120Nm (88 ft lb) is finally what I decided to use.

    Wear & Tear:

    My pads lasted about 8 track days and they wore down on the fronts (inside of the wheel) first.

    The rear Corsas lasted 4000 miles, fronts lasted 6000 miles. You may notice huge wear after the first track day but it settles down after that - I put this down to a combination of novice driver and brand new tyres.

    I have an oil and filter change every 3 trackdays and have some basic service checks done (ball joints, harness, etc).
    ..................................................

    Oh and do have fun!
    --
    Richard

  4. #4
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    2,236
    Rep Power
    20

    Default

    I would also strongly recommend an alignment check and toe adjustment, if necessary (since it is the only setting you can adjust). These settings not only affect handling and steering "feel", but also long-term tire wear, so it's important to know what's going on. On tire pressure, I have to disagree somewhat with Richard. If you want to start out with the tires set at the factory recommended cold pressures, that's fine (although I definitely recommend adding a few psi all around to help compensate for the increased loading and sidewall fex under track conditions)--but I think resetting hot tires to cold pressures can result in overworking the tire and excessive tread wear. Cold pressures are really meant for cold tires (about 60-80 degrees F), and they are not appropriate for hot tires (which could be well over 120 degrees F).
    Joel

    '67 Lotus Elan S3 DHC (owned since 1970)
    '17 Ford Focus RS

  5. #5

    Default

    With an alignment, you can also corner weight your car. Might be a good idea with ours.

    In terms of the Corsa tires, the Ferrari guys warn that they get some serious tire chunking when pressures get over 34 psi hot. Those are on heavier cars (that shouldn't really matter) and the Pirelli Corsa System tires, which have slightly different tread (that could very well make a difference though).

    It's probably something to keep in mind. Check the tires after hotlapping, and if you're ripping chunks out of the tread, double check the pressures, and drop them a bit if they're above that 34 psi mark.
    RacePrecision GotApex

    "Be ashamed to die until you have won some victory for humanity." ~ Horace Mann

  6. #6
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    1,766
    Rep Power
    20

    Default

    Wow, thanks. Since I can't even change oil, I can't do a lot of this stuff. I gotta buy a book and learn how.

    Any idea where you could strap it down on 4 corners in a trailer? Thanks for the help.

  7. Default

    Quote Originally Posted by Joel
    On tire pressure, I have to disagree somewhat with Richard. If you want to start out with the tires set at the factory recommended cold pressures, that's fine (although I definitely recommend adding a few psi all around to help compensate for the increased loading and sidewall fex under track conditions)--but I think resetting hot tires to cold pressures can result in overworking the tire and excessive tread wear. Cold pressures are really meant for cold tires (about 60-80 degrees F), and they are not appropriate for hot tires (which could be well over 120 degrees F).
    Hi Joel - thanks for the feedback. I only do a few trackdays a year and so I'm relatively new to the track day game and appreciate the advice.

    I've tried the following combinations:-

    Cold setting front: 18 and rear:27. Then just leave them alone.
    and
    Cold setting font: 20 and rear: 30. Then adjust them back down after a few laps. I first did the "adjust them back to 20 and 30" after noticing the handling quite obviously going off (rather than me just getting tired and my driving getting ragged); after adjustment then straight back out on track and proper handling was resumed. I've found the pressures had increased by 6psi for the inside rear, 4.5 psi for the outside rear and around 3psi for the fronts. This may indicate why the 18/27 settings I'd run on earlier worked reasonably well when left alone.

    Most wear on the Corsas is on the inside rear tyre. All tryes wear more on the outside edge but I believe this is due to the camber factory setting and is apparantly a compromise between road and track use. Other M400's that I've seen on track have similar tread wear patterns. I've never seen any with chunks of tread missing.

    I've also checked the tyres with a tyre pyromenter and there's ony a few degrees difference (less than 10 degrees-C IIRC) across the tread width.
    --
    Richard

  8. #8
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    1,766
    Rep Power
    20

    Default

    Thanks for all of the help. I'll update after it's over. Thanks!!

  9. #9
    Join Date
    Nov 2004
    Posts
    2,236
    Rep Power
    20

    Default

    On the tie-down question: it's generally a good idea to connect to relatively rigid parts of the car, like the suspension arms. And, ideally, the tie-down straps you use should be fabric (nylon) and run several feet fore and aft of the front and rear of the car before they attach to the trailer. It's also a good idea to be sure the transmission is in neutral while towing.

    On tire temps: if you want accurate readings they should be taken as soon as the car comes to rest in the hot pits and after a hot lap. If you wait untill after you have done a cool-down lap and return to the paddock, most of the cross-tread temperature variation will disappear. Also remember that tire temperatures will also reveal suspension set-up issues as well as tire pressure affects.
    Joel

    '67 Lotus Elan S3 DHC (owned since 1970)
    '17 Ford Focus RS

  10. #10
    Join Date
    Mar 2005
    Posts
    1,766
    Rep Power
    20

    Default

    Had a weird fuel issue. I burned 3/4 of a tank and before the last run I filled it up. I let the pump shut itself off and there was no overflow out of the tank or even splash. When I go to put the cap back in I notice it does not fit. Looking at the cap, I see the rubber bottom piece had rotated a bit and had to be rotated back in order to fit and close. I then park the car and take a 20 minute ride with my instructor in his car.

    I return to a puddle of close to 1/2 gallon of gas that had drained out of the overflow tubing from the gas tank. I was definitely flow the overflow tube. I backed the car up and got only a few drops with no further problems. Any ideas? Thanks for all the help.

    Joel, so you don't do pressures before you run but after? Do you adjust down for hot temps? I check before my run and that was it.

Posting Permissions

  • You may not post new threads
  • You may not post replies
  • You may not post attachments
  • You may not edit your posts
  •